Advertisements

Be Unique. Be Great.

MOST BIZARRE MEDICAL REMEDIES FROM HISTORY

Going back as far as Ancient Egyptians, moldy bread was used as a disinfectant. Well, mold does inhibit bacteria growth, so maybe this wasn’t so crazy. Penicillin, anyone?

Moldy Bread

img1467-65514

Going back as far as Ancient Egyptians, moldy bread was used as a disinfectant. Well, mold does inhibit bacteria growth, so maybe this wasn’t so crazy. Penicillin, anyone?

Tongue Cutting

img1467-65515

The motto of the 1800s could have been “you stutter, you die”. Stutterers of the day were treated by having half of their tongue cut off. Most of them bled to death. But hey, no more stuttering!

Needles

img1467-65516

Sure we use needles today for injections and acupuncture, but they were used for eye surgeries back in the Middle Ages! Needles were used to shove cataracts to the back of the eye. Just thinking about it is making me squirm!

Hot Irons

img1467-65517

Got hemorrhoids in the Middle Ages? Then you’d likely have stuck a hot iron, you know, up there.

Arsenic

img1467-65518

Arsenic was used for everything from Victorian cosmetics to an 18th century cure for Malaria. Because toxic metalloid poisoning is fun.

Clysters

img1467-65519

Basically, a medieval enema. People put all sorts of stuff up their rectums hoping for a cure. It did cure constipation though, so that’s something.

Drugs, Man

img1467-65520

Coca leaves (you know, cocaine) were used in many medicinal tonics in the mid-1800s, including the original recipe for Coca-Cola. Not surprisingly, these tonics were super popular! Heroin was also used in children’s cough suppressants as a “non-addictive” form of morphine. Oh yeah, and Hitler was a hypochondriac who used crystal meth to stay healthy.

Horoscopes

img1467-65521

Some medieval European doctors were legally required to consult a patient’s horoscope before making a diagnosis.

Bloodletting

img1467-65522

Medieval doctors believed “excess” blood made you ill, so they removed it. Leeches were also seen as “preventative medicine.”

Snake Oil

img1467-65523

Now this phrase is used to mean any fraudulent remedy, but back in Ancient China snake oil was a real thing. They would use it for joint pain.

Farts

img1467-65524

It was thought smelly odors caused the black plague. Since the modern medical understanding of the day was that “like cured like,” people would seal their farts into jars, and open the jars when the plague hit town. Ah, medieval logic.

Malaria

img1467-65525

Due to how high it raises the body’s temperature, patients were infected with malaria in order to kill the syphilis bacteria. Side effects included death from malaria.

Powder Of Sympathy

img1467-65526

This 17th century treatment for battle wounds consisted of ground up pig brains, mummified corpses, and earth worms. I’ll stick to Neosporin, thank you.

Urine

img1467-65527

Medieval doctors would often come by a diagnosis by smelling, examining, and even tasting the patient’s urine. Urine was also later used as a battlefield disinfectant (arguably the most sanitary thing available).

Mice

img1467-65528

Ironically, the actual cause of the plague was seen as a medical remedy. Ancient Egyptians used mashed up mice to cure toothaches, and Elizabethan Englanders cut mice in half and rubbed them on warts.

Trepanation, Lobotomies, And Ice Picks

img1467-65529

Arguably some of the scariest on this list. Trepanation involved drilling holes in the patient’s head to relieve migraines. Lobotomies were similarly performed to cure psychosis. And in an effort to save time, ice picks were shoved into patients’ eye sockets to achieve the same results.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Translate »